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Submission Guidelines

Project Syndicate welcomes unsolicited submissions, representing a broad range of academic and professional fields and points of view, by qualified authors from around the world. Prospective contributors are encouraged to familiarize themselves with Project Syndicate’s offerings when considering whether their submission addresses a relevant topic.

Authors should note that Project Syndicate’s mission is to provide its member publications with original commentaries that analyze, rather than report on, current global events and trends, thereby giving deeper meaning and context to their coverage. Contributors typically have demonstrated expertise on, or related to, the topic they are addressing.

Prospective contributors should adhere to the following guidelines:

  • The submission must be in English, accompanied by a brief note containing a short description of the commentary and the author’s qualifications.
  • The submission must be exclusive to Project Syndicate. Submissions that have been published elsewhere in any form and in any language, in print or online, will not be considered.
  • The submission should be made directly by the author or author’s staff. Public-relations representatives are requested to advise their clients accordingly.
  • The ideal length of a Project Syndicate commentary is 800-900 words. Submissions should not be shorter than 700 words or exceed 1,000 words.
  • Project Syndicate commentaries are aimed at a knowledgeable non-specialist audience. Submissions may not contain footnotes or endnotes, though they should include, wherever possible, links to cited data, quotes, speeches, reports, or academic research.
  • The ideal Project Syndicate commentary is an intellectual argument or policy proposal intended to inform readers and broaden public debate. Project Syndicate will not consider for publication articles that do not fulfill this purpose, or that undermine it.
  • Accompanying images, graphs, or figures should be at least 540 pixels wide and should be submitted in JPEG or PNG format. We prefer to create graphs in-house, so inclusion of raw data sets is recommended. We reserve the right not to use such materials.

In some cases, submissions are accepted for online-only use. These commentaries appear on Project Syndicate’s website but are not syndicated to our member publications.

Authors whose submissions have been accepted are notified as quickly as possible. All questions regarding an accepted submission should be directed to the relevant Project Syndicate editor. Authors are requested not to contact Project Syndicate’s Prague office regarding the status of an accepted submission.

Unsolicited submissions to Project Syndicate are accepted or declined at the sole discretion of the editors. Unfortunately, we cannot respond to every submission. Prospective contributors who do not receive a reply within five days should feel free to submit their manuscript elsewhere.

To submit an unsolicited commentary to Project Syndicate, please email submissions@project-syndicate.org.

  1. volz8_iStock  Getty Images Plus_global finance iStock / Getty Images Plus
    Free to read

    A Monetary and Economic Order Fit for the Twenty-First Century

    Ulrich Volz, et al. identify eight priorities to build a more resilient, inclusive, and sustainable global financial architecture.
  2. ghazouani1_YANICK FOLLYAFP via Getty Images_africachildren Yanick Folly/AFP via Getty Images

    Putting Africa on the Path to Prosperity

    Mohamed Ould Ghazouani & Ajay Banga urge the G7 to focus on the continent’s future, and on five priorities in particular, at this week’s summit.
  3. op_benami1_LOUAI BESHARAAFP via Getty Images_syriaconflict Louai Beshara/AFP via Getty Images

    Anatomy of a Massacre

    Shlomo Ben-Ami

    The 1860 massacre of Christians in Damascus holds useful lessons about what it takes to arrest – and recover from – inter-communal violence. But there is a difference between a pogrom and a genocide, and conflating the two can do more harm than good.

    considers what the 1860 massacre of Christians in Damascus can and cannot teach us about preventing genocide.
  4. GettyImages-2156649816 Photo by Nikolas Kokovlis/NurPhoto via Getty Images

    AI: Hope or Hype?

    Whether generative artificial intelligence will do more harm or good to our families, economies, and societies remains an open question. In devising strategies for harnessing the technology, optimism is undoubtedly warranted, but it should not come at the expense of realism.

  5. ehrenreich1_Francis DeanCorbis via Getty Images_denmark eu Francis Dean/Corbis via Getty Images

    How Denmark Keeps the Far Right at Bay

    Michael Ehrenreich explains how mainstream parties have neutralized the threat of right-wing populists.
  6. slobodian1_ Drew AngererGetty Images_peterthieltrump Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    How Techno-Libertarians Fell in Love with Big Government

    Quinn Slobodian argues Silicon Valley investors are against the state only insofar as it is not enriching them personally.
  7. gros187_CostfotoNurPhoto via Getty Images_china semiconductor Costfoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

    How Chinese Savings Can Support the Global Green Transition

    Daniel Gros urges the EU to welcome cheap low-carbon goods, such as electric vehicles, from China.
  8. menino1_Michael NigroPacific PressLightRocket via Getty Images_divest Michael Nigro/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

    Who’s Afraid of Colonization?

    Frederico Menino thinks the concept can be repurposed to help overcome the deficiencies of current social advocacy.
  9. Electric car charging Sergei Fadeichev/Getty Images

    Europe Needs Chinese Investment

    Dalia Marin urges European policymakers to focus on boosting FDI flows from technologically advanced economies.

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